AROM: Letter of Support for MOC Chair and Inner Council Resignation

I’m a little late on the game posting this (it’s been a busy couple of weeks!), but you should definitely know about it. The Anti-Racism and Anti-Oppression Work in Midwifery (AROM) working group was formed very recently and has been especially active since the resignation letter to MANA from the MOC Chair and Inner Council.

Our work includes deepening our knowledge of, and developing ways to break down, systems of oppression and domination, including but not limited to racism/white supremacy, patriarchy/sexism, classism, ableism, heterosexism/homophobia/transphobia, and xenophobia based on perceived nation of origin and religion.

We have published a response letter on the AROM blog and we are looking for more birth workers to join in this crucial work.

We, the undersigned, express our unconditional support for the statement and actions of the former Chair and Inner Council of the Midwives Alliance of North America (MANA) Midwives of Color Section and all midwives of color who feel represented by these positions. We wish to acknowledge the experience of many, many years of devaluation and dismissal of midwives of color by the professional midwifery community. We acknowledge the interpersonal racism that has characterized the interactions in general between midwives of color and white midwives. We also acknowledge the deep institutional racism within midwifery in the United States as a whole, which characterizes our professional organizations, educational institutions, learning environments, conferences, and group interactions. We acknowledge that this situation has its roots in the systematic elimination of midwives of color over the course of the 20th century by the white-dominant health care system’s neglect, devaluation, and violation of the bodies, ways of knowing, and communities of people of color. We acknowledge that, in some cases, white midwives were complicit in this elimination. We acknowledge the fact that, among many negative effects, this institutional racism continues to exclude and marginalize students and midwives of color today. Moreover, in failing to confront this legacy and to actively work to transform it, the midwifery profession as a whole participates in limiting access to care for women of color, and perpetuates the structures of racial and economic injustice and inequity in maternal and infant health in the United States and internationally. Continue reading …

How can you help? Read the letter and add your name as a signatory. Join the AROM Facebook Group. Find other ways to get involved and get inspired by the work we’re doing. Pass the word, repost the letter, tell everyone you know who is involved in midwifery. Begin having discussions about anti-racism and anti-oppression in your community and find ways to work towards birth justice.

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Birth Justice

In my last post, I mentioned that I was listening to this radio broadcast talking about homebirth and midwifery in communities of color both in Miami and internationally. The broadcast features Tamika Middleton a doula who is also a co-founder of Black Women Birthing Resistance and the two midwives from the brand new nonprofit Mobile Midwife, Jamara Amani and Anjali Sardeshmukh. The entire program is worth a listen, but I transcribed a few pieces that I found to be particularly interesting dealing with race and birth outcomes. I’ve been talking and thinking about this topic for awhile, but I think these women said it particularly eloquently. (Emphasis below is mine.)

Jamara Amani: Locally here in Miami Dade county one of the things that we’re really concerned about, and it is a problem across the nation, is the high rates of maternal and infant mortality. And it really does impact Black communities disproportionately. There’s huge disparities. Black women are four times as likely as White women to die in childbirth or in a cause related to childbirth, and Black babies are twice as likely to die in the first year of life as White babies. And there’s several factors that are involved in that. Tamika talked about the generational trauma around birth, around raising our babies. You know, there’s lack of access to resources, there’s the stress of living in a racialized society, there’s economic injustice, lack of access to healthcare, and one of the major issues that we’re raising is lack of access to midwifery care. And we know from research and studies that have been done that midwives can help to greatly reduce these disparities by helping women to stay healthy during their pregnancies, to work through some of those traumas, to develop a relationship with trust and a rapport that is individualized for that particular woman’s experience, to provide her with education that she needs to have a healthy outcome, and then to provide birth support that is natural, that is not full of unnecessary interventions that happen in hospitals such as medications and surgeries. And so what we’re working to do is to raise awareness about midwifery as a solution to these glaring health disparirites…

Anjali Sardeshmukh: Midwives do provide a lot of care afterwards too, and that’s a really important time. So when Muhammed talked about this isolation that happens I think one of the gems of midwifery care is that it really does look at … who is this person and who is in her community and where is she from and to honor that too…

And finally:

Jamara: I want to just say too that some folks may feel like, “Well, this issue doesn’t really apply to me ’cause I’m not pregnant or I don’t have kids or I’m a man or I’m too old to have kids” or whatever reasons but this is really a community issue. It’s an issue of justice. If you were born, then this affects you so it affects all of us. And healthy mothers and healthy babies are everybody’s business. Because at the end of the day if we want to have a healthy community, we really have to take care of our moms and babies and this is an issue of justice, of liberation. Because how we birth has a lot to do with how we live …where do we enter. And there’s a saying that a lot of midwives like to say which is “peace on earth begins with birth.” So if you have a peaceful, gentle birth experience where your mother feels empowered, feels like she can do anything, feels like … her rights are being respected, then how does that affect how she mothers you? How does that affect how you’re raised? How does that affect how she interacts with, you know, other aspects of mothering? I think it’s just … such a initiation point and a transformation point for women … entering motherhood. It’s a place where I feel like we have to have justice.

Recent Events in the Life of one Student Midwife

What’s been going on in the life of this student midwife lately? A lot of beautiful things. I’ve been:

:: Attending some beautiful, smooth, and perfectly normal homebirths

:: Starting to perform more hands-on skills with clients, and just in general get more involved and enmeshed in this practice

:: Increasing my own confidence dramatically when talking with clients, piping up frequently to share my own knowledge or unique point of view

:: Helping teach childbirth education classes

:: Trying to beat the Austin heat by drinking coconut water, fizzy fruit juices, and delicious tomato cucumber salads

:: Listening to radio shows featuring Ina May Gaskin and talking about birth justice while cleaning my kitchen

:: Bringing breakfast in bed to my sweetie after long nights up with our new puppy

:: Getting opportunities to palpate bellies holding twins and breeches. Increasingmy skills and feeling honored to be a part of these mamas’ journeys

:: Getting more involved in the queer community in Austin

:: Taken on my first client where I will (keep your fingers crossed) act as primary under supervision for much of her prenatal care and at her birth. The first one of many, I hope

:: And finally, trying to take really good care of myself as I gear up for what may well be adeluge of births in the next couple of weeks