AROM: Letter of Support for MOC Chair and Inner Council Resignation

I’m a little late on the game posting this (it’s been a busy couple of weeks!), but you should definitely know about it. The Anti-Racism and Anti-Oppression Work in Midwifery (AROM) working group was formed very recently and has been especially active since the resignation letter to MANA from the MOC Chair and Inner Council.

Our work includes deepening our knowledge of, and developing ways to break down, systems of oppression and domination, including but not limited to racism/white supremacy, patriarchy/sexism, classism, ableism, heterosexism/homophobia/transphobia, and xenophobia based on perceived nation of origin and religion.

We have published a response letter on the AROM blog and we are looking for more birth workers to join in this crucial work.

We, the undersigned, express our unconditional support for the statement and actions of the former Chair and Inner Council of the Midwives Alliance of North America (MANA) Midwives of Color Section and all midwives of color who feel represented by these positions. We wish to acknowledge the experience of many, many years of devaluation and dismissal of midwives of color by the professional midwifery community. We acknowledge the interpersonal racism that has characterized the interactions in general between midwives of color and white midwives. We also acknowledge the deep institutional racism within midwifery in the United States as a whole, which characterizes our professional organizations, educational institutions, learning environments, conferences, and group interactions. We acknowledge that this situation has its roots in the systematic elimination of midwives of color over the course of the 20th century by the white-dominant health care system’s neglect, devaluation, and violation of the bodies, ways of knowing, and communities of people of color. We acknowledge that, in some cases, white midwives were complicit in this elimination. We acknowledge the fact that, among many negative effects, this institutional racism continues to exclude and marginalize students and midwives of color today. Moreover, in failing to confront this legacy and to actively work to transform it, the midwifery profession as a whole participates in limiting access to care for women of color, and perpetuates the structures of racial and economic injustice and inequity in maternal and infant health in the United States and internationally. Continue reading …

How can you help? Read the letter and add your name as a signatory. Join the AROM Facebook Group. Find other ways to get involved and get inspired by the work we’re doing. Pass the word, repost the letter, tell everyone you know who is involved in midwifery. Begin having discussions about anti-racism and anti-oppression in your community and find ways to work towards birth justice.

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Institutionalized Racism, White Privilege, and MANA

Oh my goodness. If you haven’t been following along, there has been a tremendous amount of activity in the last two weeks within MANA, the Midwives Alliance of North America.

Here is a rundown of what has happened so far:

  1. On May 21, the Midwives of Color (MOC) MANA section chair and her Inner Council resigned en masse from their board positions within MANA and the organization itself, citing continued institutionalized racism and continued inaction on MANA’s part. The midwives who resigned are the MOC Chair Darynée Blount and the MOC Inner Council: Jennie Joseph, Jessica Roach, Ayesha Ibrahim, Claudia Booker and Michelle Peixinho. All of these are midwives and student midwives for whom I have nothing but the deepest respect and admiration. They are absolutely top midwifery leaders and activists and are at the forefront of reproductive and birth justice work in the midwifery world. MANA lost some of their best midwives when these women resigned. You can read the entire resignation letter here.
  2. MANA responded on their Facebook page by trying initiate conversations about what happened and where to move forward in the future (these can be an infuriating experience to read, be forewarned). They continue to write letters to their membership and the public at large explaining their position, stating the work they have already done and where they see their next steps, and making public a sort of apology that did not take any real ownership for racism and racist practices they have perpetuated through the history of MANA. You can all of these public statements here.
  3. Jessica Roach, one of the MOC Inner Council Members who resigned, wrote a response letter.
  4. Wendy Gordon wrote a letter of apology. This letter addresses her own shortcomings, examines her role in perpetuating racism in midwifery, and makes a commitment to move forward and make changes in the future. It looks a lot more like the apology letter I would have liked to have seen from MANA.
  5. Perez covered the resignation on the Radical Doula blog here and here. I think she really hits the nail on the head here:

    “Again, for me, the bottom line is this: we can no longer ignore the disproportionately high negative maternal and infant health outcomes faced by communities of color.
    “And it’s going to be damn hard to address those disparities if we can’t even address racism in our own organizations–especially if that racism means that providers of color choose to leave or are pushed out.

    “The needs of communities of color in maternity care can no longer be the topic of an interest group, or a caucus, or a breakout session. It has to be THE FOCUS. And my guess is that if we address the needs of communities of color, we’ll probably change maternity care in ways that benefit everyone.”

  6. There have been some calls for a resignation of the entire MANA board, a radical restructuring of the power systems within the organization, and a new board with MOC members committed to institutional change. Personally, I am supportive of this proposal. I think it’s going to take radical change like this resignation and other organizational restructuring to dismantle the systems of power currently in place and rebuild an organization that actually serves all midwives, parents, and children.

Frankly, MANA’s response it is too little way too late. A lot of it looks like white guilt and lip service to me, without any real sweeping change that will effect anything substantive. Within the past year, they launched a social justice agenda, brought some anti-oppression trainers on-board, and started to offer workshops at MANA conferences. What is needed is deep, sweeping institutional change and a strong commitment to undoing the the harm caused by racism in the past and in the future. We need to re-examine our priorities as midwives and own up to our own role in the racism inherent in white-dominated midwifery as it stands today. No ifs ands or buts. Each and every white midwife needs to learn about anti-racism and anti-oppression work and commit to continuing this learning process for the rest of their tenure as a midwife. They need to examine their own role in the racist attitudes, actions, and statements perpetuated by them, their fellow midwives, and their midwifery organization. It is each white midwife’s duty to learn about white privilege and own their own shit. Not only is this imperative for the profession as a whole, it is crucial that we do this in order to serve our clients better and all birthing parents.

I think midwifery has an incredible opportunity here to really effect the racial disparities facing Black and Native American families specifically when it comes to maternal and infant mortality. Will we let the opportunity slip us by? I sincerely hope not. I am done pussy-footing around here and I am sick of forgiving ignorance and racism as par for the course when it comes to midwifery. Our clients deserve better, our students deserve better, and we ourselves deserve better. I am fed up.

I want to state for the record that although I am a student midwife, I am not a member of MANA. I was considering joining my professional organization when I had enough extra money to do so although lately I have been re-thinking things. I already knew that MANA had a serious and long-standing problematic relationship with race and racism. However, watching how MANA has dealt with the resignation and the aftermath, I am less than impressed. I don’t know that I can, in good conscience and at this time, join an organization that midwives the likes of Jennie Joseph and Michelle Peixinho feel they can no longer be a part of.

Teaching Diversity at Midwifery School

Recently, I was asked to teach the diversity course to the first year students at my midwifery school. I was completely surprised and honored to be asked to do so. At my school, the diversity class is a brief 3-hour seminar. That, coupled with one other brief seminar on cultural competency in the second year is the full extent of time we spend talking and thinking about anything that amounts to reproductive justice in my book. It is the only time we have to explore and examine providing birth services to folks who are not White, middle or upper class, straight, Christian, able-bodied, English-speaking, American citizens (etc. etc. etc.) clients. It is something I think homebirth midwives on the whole do not talk enough about, but that’s a whole other post meant for another day. However, I do think it’s crucial to give all midwifery students a good basic understanding of the issues at play here and some tools to keep exploring.

As far as I could tell, the class went over fairly well. It definitely was a good learning ground for myself and how I might design future trainings. I started the class by telling the students that I hoped they walked out of the class with their interest piqued, curious to learn more. Basically, we talked about the meanings of prejudice and oppression, broke down the ways in which oppression is systemic, and then talked about the ways in which we can change things, both on an individual and a systemic level. There’s not a whole lot you can learn about anti-oppression work and reproductive justice in 3 hours, so I viewed this as just the tippy tippy top of the iceberg. My hope was that if I gave them just a taste that they would go home wanting more and delve into more learning on their own.

The next exciting part of this story is that just today I volunteered to offer this training to my class and it looks like it might be offered to local midwives who are interested as well. This seems like a good place for me to get started and hopefully keep talking to folks about these issues. My hope is that some more awareness of anti-racism, anti-oppression, and reproductive justice work can truly transform midwifery.